Students at commencement

Meet the Faculty

Guillermo C. Hansen

Guillermo C. Hansen

Associate Professor of Global Christianity, Societies and Cultures & Martin Luther King Jr. Chair

Biography

Guillermo César Hansen joined the Luther Seminary faculty in 2008 as associate professor of systematic theology. A native of Buenos Aires, Argentina, Hansen served as tenured professor of systematic theology and ethics (1996-2008), as chairperson of the department of systematic theology (2000-2008) and director of post-graduate and doctoral studies (2003-2008) at ISEDET - Ecumenical Theological University, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Beginning in 2006 Hansen served as vice president of the United Evangelical Lutheran Church of Argentina and Uruguay.

Hansen received the Master of Divinity degree from ISEDET (1986), the Master of Sacred Theology degree from Trinity Lutheran Seminary, Columbus, Ohio (1988), the Master of Theology degree (1990) and the Doctor of Philosophy degree (1995) from Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (LSTC).

Hansen also served as assistant instructor at Trinity Lutheran Seminary (1987-1988), assistant and visiting professor at LSTC (1990-1993, 2000), visiting scholar at Universidad Luterana Salvadoreña, El Salvador (1993), and instructor at the LWF (2009). Hansen held several positions in the United Evangelical Lutheran Church of Argentina and Uruguay ranging from clergy member to director of studies for the ministerium of the United Evangelical Lutheran Church. Additionally, he has done work with the ELCA and served as a theological advisor to the Department of Theological Studies in the Lutheran World Federation-LWF (1997-2003). Presently he is serving in the steering committee of the Association of Teaching Theologians of the ELCA/ELCIC, he is member of the ELCA Executive Planning Team for the observance of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, and member of the LWF study project “Self-understanding of the Lutheran Communion.”

Hansen has presented at numerous conferences and workshops in Argentina, Brazil, South Africa, Costa Rica, Germany, Denmark, Switzerland, Germany and the US, and most recently being the lecturer for the “ Luther Lectures” at PLTS (2014), and keynote speaker at the Convocation of Teaching Theologians of the ELCA/ELCIC (2013), and the conference on HIV/AIDS and Theology (Costa Rica, 2013). He has published many articles, essays and chapters in both Spanish and English on public theology, theology and science, church and globalization, and themes on Lutheran and contemporary theology. Hansen’s published books include “Nuestra Fe: Una introducción a la teología”(Our Faith: An Introduction to Theology) (with Dr. Nancy Bedford), and “En las fisuras: esbozos luteranos para nuestro tiempo”(In the Fissures: Lutheran Sketches for Our Times).

His areas of teaching expertise include Lutheran Theology, Systematic Theology, Liberation Theology and Post-colonial theologies, Theology and Sciences (concentration in the Mind Sciences, evolution and memetics), and Theology and Culture/Society (concentration on Late-Modernity, Globalization, Secularity and Pluralism).

Courses

LG 4525 01SPANISH FOR MINISTRY Spring Semester 2015-2016

This course is designed for students with some college level Spanish language ability who want to gain theological and ministerial competency in this language by practicing preaching, teaching, and ministering in Spanish. A combination of readings, conversational practice, assignments and participation in Spanish-speaking churches and cultural and musical activities will hone skills and communication strategies for ministry among Spanish-speaking audiences and communities. NOTE: After enrolling, students will need to demonstrate a mid-range college level ability in Spanish (on-line, via Augsburg College, no cost for the student). Please contact the Registrar's Office or instructor for details. Tutorial sessions may be offered during the first weeks of the course. Be advised that this course include 4 visits to selected off-campus sites during the Semester. Visits will take place the same days of class. Time-flexibility will be expected from those registering for at least 4 Thursdays.

ST 1422 01CHURCHS ENCOUNTER W WORLD RELIGIONSSpring Semester 2015-2016

This course examines the encounter of the Christian church with the practices and beliefs of the major world religions in the local, regional and global contexts. It explores the claims, beliefs, and practices of these religions and how they relate to our identity as Christians. Students will also study different contemporary paradigms that seek to understand these encounters within a Trinitarian theology of religions. Note: This course includes visits to selected sites during the Semester. Visits will take place on Fridays, though at different times than the scheduled time-slot for the class. These visits will replace the regular residential session for that particular Friday. Students registering for this class must have some time-flexibility during five Fridays (3/4; 3/18; 4/8; 4/22; 4/29). FULFILLS CCME OR MISSION I - SPRING 2015-2016: PLEASE NOTE: Each immersion trip replaces a morning class session, ON FRIDAY AFTERNOON. The dates and times for the 5 trips are as follows: March 4 Judaism 11 am - 5:30 pm March 18 Hinduism 11 am - 5:30 pm April 8 Buddhism 11 am - 5:30 pm April 22 Islam 11 am - 5:30 pm April 29 Indigenous Religions 11 am - 5:30 pm

CO 8000COMPREHENSIVE EXAMS-PHD Fall Semester 2015-2016

ST 1420 01THEOLOGY AND CHURCH IN GLOBAL SOUTHFall Semester 2015-2016

What are the concerns and prominent themes among Christians in the Global South? Why should we listen? As the Christian Church shifts its demographic density to the South, new theological perspectives populate the ecumenical and confessional conversation. This course will focus upon the theological themes and methods emerging from Africa, Asia and Latin America, and how the classical doctrinal themes are approached from these contexts enriching and expanding the perspectives of the North-American churches. Prerequisite: Core course in ST. FULFILLS CCME OR MISSIONS

ST 1426 50GOD AND ECONOMY-FAITH AND CONSUMER Fall Semester 2015-2016

“You shall have no other gods,” what does it mean in our present consumerist age? This course is a study of the biblical, patristic and reformation understandings of faith in relation to the economy, particularly as a “holy order” through which God ministers to us and we minister one another. It seeks to provide an analysis of the historical and structural emergence of capital, the market system and consumerism and analyze it through the theological lens provided by the First Commandment and the doctrine of the two kingdoms. It will explore theological and ethical criteria for Christian vocation and provide tools for moral deliberation in ministry and congregational settings around economic issues. FALL 2015: MEETS WITH ST6427

ST 6421 01THEOLOGY AND CHURCH IN GLOBAL SOUTHFall Semester 2015-2016

What are the concerns and prominent themes among Christians in the Global South? Why should we listen? As the Christian Church shifts its demographic density to the South, new theological perspectives populate the ecumenical and confessional conversation. This course will focus upon the theological themes and methods emerging from Africa, Asia and Latin America, and how the classical doctrinal themes are approached from these contexts enriching and expanding the perspectives of the North-American churches. Prerequisite: Core course in ST

ST 6427 50GOD AND ECONOMY-FAITH CONSUMER-ONLIFall Semester 2015-2016

“You shall have no other gods,” what does it mean in our present consumerist age? This course is a study of the biblical, patristic and reformation understandings of faith in relation to the economy, particularly as a “holy order” through which God ministers to us and we minister one another. It seeks to provide an analysis of the historical and structural emergence of capital, the market system and consumerism and analyze it through the theological lens provided by the First Commandment and the doctrine of the two kingdoms. It will explore theological and ethical criteria for Christian vocation and provide tools for moral deliberation in ministry and congregational settings around economic issues. FALL 2015: MEETS WITH ST1426-50

ST 1422 01CHURCHS ENCOUNTER W WORLD RELIGIONSSummer Term 2014-2015

This course examines the encounter of the Christian church with the practices and beliefs of the major world religions in the local, regional and global contexts. It explores the claims, beliefs, and practices of these religions and how they relate to our identity as Christians. Students will also study different contemporary paradigms that seek to understand these encounters within a Trinitarian theology of religions.

ST 1420 01THEOLOGY AND CHURCH IN GLOBAL SOUTHSpring Semester 2014-2015

What are the concerns and prominent themes among Christians in the Global South? Why should we listen? As the Christian Church shifts its demographic density to the South, new theological perspectives populate the ecumenical and confessional conversation. This course will focus upon the theological themes and methods emerging from Africa, Asia and Latin America, and how the classical doctrinal themes are approached from these contexts enriching and expanding the perspectives of the North-American churches. Prerequisite: Core course in ST

ST 1426 01GOD AND ECONOMY-FAITH AND CONSUMER Spring Semester 2014-2015

“You shall have no other gods,” what does it mean in our present consumerist age? This course is a study of the biblical, patristic and reformation understandings of faith in relation to the economy, particularly as a “holy order” through which God ministers to us and we minister one another. It seeks to provide an analysis of the historical and structural emergence of capital, the market system and consumerism and analyze it through the theological lens provided by the First Commandment and the doctrine of the two kingdoms. It will explore theological and ethical criteria for Christian vocation and provide tools for moral deliberation in ministry and congregational settings around economic issues.

ST 6421 01THEOLOGY AND CHURCH IN GLOBAL SOUTHSpring Semester 2014-2015

What are the concerns and prominent themes among Christians in the Global South? Why should we listen? As the Christian Church shifts its demographic density to the South, new theological perspectives populate the ecumenical and confessional conversation. This course will focus upon the theological themes and methods emerging from Africa, Asia and Latin America, and how the classical doctrinal themes are approached from these contexts enriching and expanding the perspectives of the North-American churches. Prerequisite: Core course in ST

ST 1424 01LIBERATION THEOL AND RECEPTION January Term 2014-2015

Is there such a thing as a liberationist Lutheran theology? This course is a study of the historical and contemporary writings and trends of Liberation Theology (Latin American, African-American, Feminist, Dalit, Minjung, Queer) and its creative, critical and constructive reception within the grammar of Lutheran and Protestant theology. The course will focus upon the origins of Liberation Theology, its methodology and main theological and ethical themes (praxis, option for the poor, liberation, Kingdom of God, spirituality, cross, and Christology); and the reception and constructive critique by a selected number of Lutheran and protestant theologians as they seek to integrate the methodological and theological/ethical challenge of liberation theology by re-interpreting classical themes such as justification, faith and works, two kingdoms, cross, church and vocation. Prerequisite: A Systematic Theology course. Course SG0401 will satisfy ST prerequisite.

ST 6424 01LIBERATION THEOLOGIES AND RECEPTIONJanuary Term 2014-2015

Is there such a thing as a liberationist Lutheran theology? This course is a study of the historical and contemporary writings and trends of Liberation Theology (Latin American, African-American, Feminist, Dalit, Minjung, Queer) and its creative, critical and constructive reception within the grammar of Lutheran and Protestant theology. The course will focus upon the origins of Liberation Theology, its methodology and main theological and ethical themes (praxis, option for the poor, liberation, Kingdom of God, spirituality, cross, and Christology); and the reception and constructive critique by a selected number of Lutheran and protestant theologians as they seek to integrate the methodological and theological/ethical challenge of liberation theology by re-interpreting classical themes such as justification, faith and works, two kingdoms, cross, church and vocation. Prerequisite: A Systematic Theology course. Course SG0401 will satisfy ST prerequisite.

ST 0415 01TRIUNE GOD AND WORLD-GOD THE CREATOFall Semester 2014-2015

This course provides instruction and practice in theologically-based practical reasoning for ministerial contexts, including a comprehensive, coherent presentation of the articles of faith, and cultivating theological imagination in view of communities and neighbors through current questions, challenges to faith, and awareness of diverse contexts. Each class will focus on a particular article of the creed or related Christian doctrines for the practices of ministry. Focus: GOD THE CREATOR

ST 1422 01 F6CHURCHS ENCOUNTER W WORLD RELIGIONSFall Semester 2014-2015

This course examines the encounter of the Christian church with the practices and beliefs of the major world religions in the local, regional and global contexts. It explores the claims, beliefs, and practices of these religions and how they relate to our identity as Christians. Students will also study different contemporary paradigms that seek to understand these encounters within a Trinitarian theology of religions.

ST 6422 01 F6CHURCHS ENCOUNTER WITH WORLD RELIG Fall Semester 2014-2015

This course examines the encounter of the Christian church with the practices and beliefs of the major world religions in the local, regional and global contexts. It explores the claims, beliefs, and practices of these religions and how they relate to our identity as Christians. Students will also study different contemporary paradigms that seek to understand these encounters within a Trinitarian theology of religions.