Paul S. Chung
Assoc Prof, Mission and World Christianity

"We do live in a multicultural world," he said. "I'm pleased that Luther Seminary is committed to global mission and to addressing the challenge of world Christianity in a postmodern, multicultural context. I'm delighted to be a part of the Luther community."

Paul S. Chung, an ordained ELCA pastor, who spent 10 years in parish ministry and most recently taught at Wartburg Theological Seminary, is excited by his new role at Luther Seminary. "I believe that theology is a way of communicating the Word of God to everyone, especially in solidarity with those who are marginalized and innocent victims," he said.

He is especially enthusiastic about helping students become God's servants with a commitment to missional discipleship. "We do live in a multicultural world," he said. "I'm pleased that Luther Seminary is committed to global mission and to addressing the challenge of world Christianity in a postmodern, multicultural context. I'm delighted to be a part of the Luther community."

Chung believes that students are called to witness to God's justifying grace in terms of their roles as disciples. He finds that students deepen their understanding of theology by studying the texts as well as by learning about God's grace of justification and about missional commitment. "Theology does not fall from heaven," he explained. "Understanding theology requires engaging the tradition of a faith community as well as embracing public issues in our own backyards," he said.

According to Chung, Christianity today needs to be a living mission community to become more than an institutionalized entity. "To resonate in today's world, Christianity must be a joyous witness to the living voice of God in the world," he said.

In an age of world Christianity, Chung considers the disciplines of theology and hermeneutics – the science of studying the biblical texts – to be allies that should work together. Chung believes that Christians should engage creatively with God in the church as well as in the public sphere because theology involves studying the texts for Christian beliefs as well as for beliefs about basic civil rights, such as freedom. "Theological witness to the living voice of God must be connected with our daily life in society," he said.