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Available Courses

Browse 2015 - 2016 classes

This year we continue the series on Lutheran theology and the Lutheran church designed to prepare you for the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation in 2017.

Lay School Courses

Fall:   October 12-November 9, 2015 Winter:   February 8 - March 7, 2016 Spring:   April 4 - May 2, 2016

Acts: New Communities by God's Grace

Fall: October 12-November 9, 2015
Course Time: MONDAY AFTERNOON 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

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How do we keep on keeping on when we're not sure about what direction to go? In the book of Acts, Jesus is no longer just down the road or around the corner, able to explain to his uncertain disciples what to do next. The disciples faced the reality of figuring out a way to witness in a complex world of many religions and cultures. They have something to tell us about community formation. In our new age, is community still important? How do we form it, find leaders, value leadership? How do we sustain communities, care for God’s people and bring along new generations? How do we interpret our Scripture in a modern context?

 

Seminar Leader:

Sarah Henrich, Professor Emeritus of New Testament

Jesus the Savior (webcast available)

Fall: October 12-November 9, 2015
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Individual Registration  (webcast or classroom)
Group Registration  (webcast only)

This course will take up salvation by going through the Three Days of the Cross, the Descent into Hell and the Resurrection. Our first focus will be the Bible and the way Paul preaches about these three things, as well as how evangelists tell the story. Then we will look at the way the church has taught these Three Days in its doctrine of crucifixion, death and resurrection, including Luther's famous theology of the cross and communication of attributes. Along with that, we’ll consider how these work in the liturgy. Finally, we will consider how to listen to preaching of Christ's death and resurrection.  Webcast available

 

Faculty:

Steven Paulson, Professor of Systematic Theology

Martin Luther—A Grand Assortment of Insights, Part 1 (500)

Fall: October 12-November 9, 2015
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

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As we approach the celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation in 2017, we will consider the profound influence of Martin Luther on theology, the church and culture. Come and hear Luther Seminary's professors reflect on how Luther's reformation insights have impacted the areas in which they teach.

 

 

Seminar Leaders:
  • “The Holy Spirit and Luther”—Lois Malcolm, Professor of Systematic Theology
  • “Luther and the New Testament”—Craig Koester, Asher O. and Carrie Nasby Professor of New Testament
  • “Luther and the Old Testament”— Michael Chan, Assistant Professor of Old Testament
  • “Luther and Political Power”— Gary Simpson, Northwestern Lutheran Theological Seminary Professor of Systematic Theology
  • “Luther: Worship Disrupts Theology!”— Dirk Lange, Associate Professor of Worship

“A People for God's Name:” Believing and Belonging in Luke and Acts (webcast available)

Winter: February 8 - March 7, 2016
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Individual Registration  (webcast or classroom)
Group Registration  (webcast only)

Survey after survey demonstrates that ethnic diversity is only increasing in recent days and yet many of our churches remain culturally homogeneous. What might a church that invites diversity look like? We will turn to the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles to wonder together how God's gift of diversity might take root in our lives together. Too often, our tendency has been to imagine that our faith “solves” the "problems" of diversity by making us all one, the same. In contrast, the author of Luke and Acts views our differences as a gift to be treasured—not a difficulty to be overcome. Webcast Available

 

Faculty:

Eric Barreto, Associate Professor of New Testament

Jeremiah: Judgment, Trauma and Hope

Winter: February 8 - March 7, 2016
Course Time: MONDAY AFTERNOON 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

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The potency of Jeremiah's rhetoric matches the severity of the judgment Judah experienced at the hands of the Babylonian army. Left without temple, land, or king, the book makes the astonishing claim that God has uprooted God's chosen people. But this word of judgment is not final. Restoration will come, but only after judgment has fallen. We’ll explore this critical moment in Israel's life and consider how the book of Jeremiah can inform Christianity identity. 

 

 

Faculty:

Michael Chan, Assistant Professor of Old Testament

Martin Luther—A Grand Assortment of Insights: Part 2 (500)

Winter: February 8 - March 7, 2016
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Register now!

As we approach the celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation in 2017, we will consider the profound influence of Martin Luther on theology, the church and culture. Come and hear Luther Seminary's professors reflect on how Luther's reformation insights have impacted the areas in which they teach.

Seminar Leaders:
  • “Luther’s Understanding of Jesus Christ”—Steven Paulson, Professor of Systematic Theology
  • “Preaching the Gospel in Hymns”—Gracia Grindal, Professor Emeritus of Rhetoric
  • “Luther Around the World Today”—Guillermo Hansen, Associate Professor of Global Christianity, Societies and Cultures
  • “Martin in America: Luther Crosses the Atlantic”—Mark Granquist, Associate Professor of Church History
  • “Luther and Ordinary Life (vocation)”—Mary Jane Haemig, Professor of Church History

Ad Fontes: The History of the Bible as a Book

Spring: April 4 - May 2, 2016
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

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There is a fascinating story of how the Bible has been fashioned and transmitted using the technology of the time to make it available to the people. From papyrus scroll, to Gutenberg’s printing revolution, we will survey the history of the Bible as it unfolds against a backdrop of political turmoil, religious devotion and technological innovation. The library’s rare book collection, photographs and online sources will help illustrate this story.

Seminar Leader:

Bruce Eldevik, Reference and Special Collections Librarian at Luther Seminary

Food and Drink in the Biblical World (webcast available)

Spring: April 4 - May 2, 2016
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Individual Registration  (webcast or classroom)
Group Registration  (webcast only)

Have you ever considered how central food and drink is to the stories, laws, poetry and images of the Scriptures? In this course we explore how food and drink functions in encounters, in moments of anxiety, in divine promise and so much more throughout the Bible. We will look at food and drink in the Torah, the historical books, the wisdom tradition, the prophets and Psalms and the New Testament. Webcast Available

 

Seminar Leaders:
  • Diane Jacobson, Professor Emeritus of Old Testament
  • Anna Grunner, Ph.D. student, Jewish Theological Seminary

Luther’s Small Catechism for Today (500)

Spring: April 4 - May 2, 2016
Course Time: MONDAY AFTERNOON 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

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Luther wrote his catechisms for use in many settings, including the home, the church and school.  How does the “Small Catechism” resonate today? How does it help individuals and congregations  focus on what is most important? This course will present and/or reacquaint you with the teachings at the heart of the Lutheran witness. 

Seminar Leaders:
  • Fred Gaiser, Professor Emeritus of Old Testament
  • Mary Jane Haemig, Professor of Church History
  • Dirk Lange, Associate Professor of Worship
  • Alvin Luedke, Professor of Rural Ministry
  • Steven Paulson, Professor of Systematic Theology
  • Walter Sundberg, Professor Emeritus of Church History

Register Today!

You may register online or complete and mail the printable form along with payment in full. Early registration is encouraged.

  • The fee for each course is $70, or $60 per course (includes webcasts ) when registering for three or more courses at one time.

  • The fee for congregation or groups to attend a course via webcast is $125.
  • New to Lay School? Choose your first class for just $35.