LAY SCHOOL Classes

Register now for 2014-2015 classes. The Lay School curriculum includes a wide variety of courses on biblical topics from both the Old and New Testaments, ecology, the Middle East and more. This year we are also introducing a series on Lutheran Theology and the Lutheran church designed to prepare you for the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation in 2017. Classes in this series will be noted with a 500 following the title.

Lay School Courses

Fall:   October 13-November 10, 2014 Winter:   January 26-February 23, 2015 Spring:   March 30-April 27, 2015  

Christians of the Middle East: Past and Future 

Fall: October 13-November 10, 2014
Course Time: MONDAY AFTERNOON 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Register now!

Jesus Christ was born in the Middle East. The Middle East is the birth place of Christianity as well as most ancient churches. This course will discuss the beginnings of these ancient churches as well as their theological, cultural, social, and political setting throughout history. These Churches had an uninterrupted presence for the last two millenniums, so what is their future in the fast changing and unstable Middle East? 

 

Faculty: Lois Farag, Associate Professor of Early Church History
 

Jeremiah: Judgment, Trauma and Hope (webcast available) 

Fall: October 13-November 10, 2014
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Individual Registration (webcast or classroom)
Group Registration for Webcast

The potency of Jeremiah's rhetoric matches the severity of the judgment Judah experienced at the hands of the Babylonian army. Left without temple, land, or king, the book makes the astonishing claim that God has uprooted God's chosen people. But this word of judgment is not final. Restoration will come, but only after judgment has fallen. This class explores this critical moment in Israel's life and considers how the book of Jeremiah can inform Christianity identity and vocation. 

Faculty: Michael Chan, Assistant Professor of Old Testament
 

Luther's Small Catechism for Today [500 Series Class] 

Fall: October 13-November 10, 2014
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Register now!

Come study Luther’s Small Catechism with some of Luther Seminary’s finest teachers!  Luther wrote his catechisms for use in many settings – including the home, the church, and the school.  (It’s not just for confirmands – it’s for everyone!)  How does the Small Catechism resonate today?  How does it help both individuals and congregations stay focused on what is most important?  This course will study the individual parts of the catechism, presenting and/or re-acquainting you with the teachings at the heart of the Lutheran witness. 

This year we are introducing a series on Lutheran theology and the Lutheran church designed to prepare you for the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation in 2017. This class is in the series.

 

 

Seminar Leaders:

Fred Gaiser, Professor Emeritus of Old Testament
Dirk Lange, Associate Professor of Worship
Alvin Luedke, Professor of Rural Ministry
Stephen Paulson, Professor of Systematic Theology
Walter Sundberg, Professor Emeritus of Church History


Faculty: Mary Jane Haemig, Professor of Church History, Director of the Reformation Research Program
 

Corinthians (webcast available) 

Winter: January 26-February 23, 2015
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Individual Registration (webcast or classroom)
Group Registration for Webcast

Join us as we get to the know Corinth, the Corinthians, and their ideas about what it meant to live as Christians. We'll read Paul's Corinthians correspondence with an eye out for their questions, assumptions, and new ways of imagining life in a world. How did (do) ordinary folk (like us) discern God's will for life in a complex society? The Corinthians had lots of questions and lots of possible answers. See how Paul helps them frame their questions and possibly our own as well.  

 

Seminar Leader:

Sarah Henrich, Professor Emeritus of New Testament


 

Lutherans in America: Beyond Alphabet Soup [500 Series Class] 

Winter: January 26-February 23, 2015
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Register now!

Sometimes the story of Lutherans in America is presented as the “alphabet soup” of church names—in other words, the history of institutions. The stories of these bodies can be important, but it’s only the beginning of the story. We'll look at the 400 year history of Lutherans in America and how these people strove to live out their religious convictions in the new—and sometimes strange religious world that is America. The story of Lutherans in America is diverse and fascinating, and together we will bring this wonderful story to life. Bring your questions and your experiences, and we’ll try to make sense of it all.

Faculty: Mark Granquist, Associate Professor of Church History
 

Revelation, Faith and the End 

Winter: January 26-February 23, 2015
Course Time: MONDAY AFTERNOON 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Register now!

Revelation is a difficult book to read. With powerful and often disturbing images, John leads us into a world of comfort and hope in the midst of persecution – but also fear and trepidation as the very foundations of the world are shaken. Making matters even more difficult are the various ways Christians have read this book. Is Revelation a precise sketch of the last days, a word of relief to early Christians or something in between? Many Christians avoid this last book of the Bible, but we shouldn’t. Here we learn that God is faithful and that God’s love knows no end.

Faculty: Eric Barreto, Associate Professor of New Testament
 

Come and See: Discipleship According to the Gospel of John (webcast available) 

Spring: March 30-April 27, 2015
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Individual Registration (webcast or classroom)
Group Registration for Webcast

Discipleship is no easy task these days and one’s identity as a Christian is constantly challenged. Perhaps the hardest part about following Jesus is to imagine that our witness in the world can make the same kind of difference as the disciples long ago. This class will imagine what we might learn from the disciples in the Gospel of John that could empower, sustain, and nurture us 21st century Christians. We will encounter the inspiring witness of persons Jesus meets in the Fourth Gospel so as to invite a renewed sense of call in our present time.

Faculty: Karoline Lewis, Associate Professor of Biblical Preaching and The Alvin N. Rogness Chair of Homiletics
 

Following Jesus in an Ecological Age 

Spring: March 30-April 27, 2015
Course Time: MONDAY EVENING 7:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Register now!

How shall we follow Jesus today, in the midst of our growing ecological crisis?  What should churches and individual disciples work toward, and why bother?  We bring Scripture study, Christian theology and ethics to bear on specific problems and concrete examples, as well as the reverse (allowing current issues to open up the Bible, theology & ethics).  Open discussion is encouraged, so bring your Bibles, your questions and your experience.

Seminar Leaders:

Kathryn Schifferdecker, Associate Professor of Old Testament


Faculty: Alan Padgett, Professor of Systematic Theology
 

The Parables: Illustrations of Jesus' Good but Strange News 

Spring: March 30-April 27, 2015
Course Time: MONDAY AFTERNOON 12:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Register now!

When I was a child, a well-meaning person explained to me that Jesus used parables when he taught because he wanted to communicate deep, spiritual truths in plain and easy-to-understand ways. That person, I now know, was completely wrong. Parables usually raise as many questions as they answer. Yes, the parables speak of easy-to-imagine ideas and situations. But they also draw us into the complexities and mysteries of Jesus’ teaching about “the kingdom of God.” You’ll come away from the course with a deeper understanding of the parables’ power to shape how we think about Christian faith, as well as an appreciation for the ways the parables make interpreting the Bible both challenging and fun.

Faculty: Matthew Skinner, Associate Professor of New Testament