Luther Seminary News

David Lose named president of LTSP

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

On May 14, Luther Seminary Professor David Lose was named president of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (LTSP). He will assume his new role at the end of the summer.

Lose currently serves as Luther Seminary's Marbury E. Anderson Chair of Biblical Preaching and the director of the Center for Biblical Preaching. As director, he started the free resource WorkingPreacher.org, which receives 2.4 million visits annually from preachers in more than 200 countries.

"David has been a gifted and imaginative teacher during his tenure on the Luther Seminary faculty. I am grateful for the ongoing legacy he leaves at Luther, and wish him the best as he is called to lead one of our sister seminaries, LTSP," said Luther Seminary Interim President Rick Foss.

Lose joined the Luther Seminary faculty in July 2000 as assistant professor of homiletics. In 2005, he received the Marbury E. Anderson Chair in Biblical Preaching. That same year, he was named academic dean, a post he held through 2008.

He is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate (1988) of Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa., and holds the Master of Divinity (1993) and Master of Sacred Theology (1997) degrees from LTSP. He earned his doctorate in homiletics from Princeton Theological Seminary (2000). Ordained in 1993, Lose served three ELCA congregations in New Jersey between 1993 and 2000.

Lose is the author of the “Making Sense” series (2009-2011), books that invite readers into conversations about matters like the cross, Scripture and the Christian faith. He is also the author of “Confessing Jesus Christ: Preaching in a Postmodern World” (2003), which was named one of the top 10 books of 2004 by the Academy of Parish Clergy. His most recent book is “Preaching at the Crossroads: How Our World—and Our Preaching—is Changing” (2013).

We extend our congratulations to him as he pursues his next call.

About Luther Seminary

Luther Seminary educates leaders for Christian communities across the country and around the world. It is one of eight seminaries in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA). Established in 1869, Luther Seminary is the result of six separate institutions consolidating through a series of mergers, the first in 1917, into a single seminary. Luther Seminary has educated more than one-third of ELCA pastors, in addition to an increasing number of lay professionals and leaders of many global Lutheran and ecumenical churches.

 

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