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Guillermo C. Hansen
Asoociate Dean for Graduate Theological Education
651-523-1647
Marsha Foster Boyd
Interim VP for Academic Affairs and Academic Dean
651-641-3468

Meet the Faculty

Lois Farag

Lois Farag

Professor of Early Church History

  • Ph.D. (The Catholic University of America)
  • M.Div. (Harvard Divinity School)

Biography

Lois Farag joined Luther Seminary in 2005 as assistant professor of Early Church History. Previously she served as adjunct faculty at Ecumenical Institute of Theology, St. Mary's Seminary and University, Baltimore, Md., Trinity College, Washington, D.C., and full time faculty at Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, Md.

Farag received the bachelor of science degree from the American University in Cairo, Egypt, in 1977. She earned her master of divinity from Harvard Divinity School, Cambridge, Mass., in 1997 and her doctorate from the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., in 2003. She also studied as a research fellow at the Institute of Christian Oriental Research, Washington, D.C.

A monastic of the Coptic Orthodox Church, Farag is a frequent lecturer. She authored St. Cyril of Alexandria, A New Testament Exegete: His Commentary on the Gospel of John. Gorgias Press, 2007, and Balance of the Heart, Desert Spirituality of Twenty-First Century Christians, Cascade Publishing, 2012.

She is a member of the North American Patristics Society, American Academy of Religion, Society of Biblical Literature, The Models of Piety in Late Antiquity Research Group.

Courses

HC 0305 33HISTORY I-FROM APOSTLES TO REFORMERSpring Semester 2019-2020

An examination of how Christians have practiced, understood and given public witness to their faith from its beginnings to the Western Reformation (1517). This course pays particular attention to topics formative of Christian identity such as orthodoxy, heresy, Trinity, mission, culture, and politics. This course considers the challenges of confessing the Christian faith in religiously pluralistic societies in Asia, Africa and Europe. Equivalency: HC0316 Apostles to Reformers

HC 0305 33 E1 01HC0305-33 EXTENDED SESS 1 - RESIDENSpring Semester 2019-2020

EXTENDED SESSION 1 FOR HC0305-33 - RESIDENTIAL

HC 0305 33 E2 50HC0305-33 EXTENDED SESS 2 - ONLINE Spring Semester 2019-2020

EXTENDED SESSION 2 FOR HC0305-33 - ONLINE

HC 2336 50AUGUSTINE OF HIPPO - ONLINE Spring Semester 2019-2020

A close study of the writings of Augustine of Hippo, the founder of Western theology as well as a major source of Martin Luther’s theology. An overview of his life and work through the extensive reading of primary sources. Special attention will be given to his philosophical presuppositions, and topics such as the growing place of grace in his theology, the question of good and evil, free will, and predestination.

HC 0305 01HISTORY I-FROM APOSTLES TO REFORMERFall Semester 2019-2020

An examination of how Christians have practiced, understood and given public witness to their faith from its beginnings to the Western Reformation (1517). This course pays particular attention to topics formative of Christian identity such as orthodoxy, heresy, Trinity, mission, culture, and politics. This course considers the challenges of confessing the Christian faith in religiously pluralistic societies in Asia, Africa and Europe. Equivalency: HC0316 Apostles to Reformers

HC 0305 50HISTORY I-FROM APOSTLES TO REF-ONLIFall Semester 2019-2020

An examination of how Christians have practiced, understood and given public witness to their faith from its beginnings to the Western Reformation (1517). This course pays particular attention to topics formative of Christian identity such as orthodoxy, heresy, Trinity, mission, culture, and politics. This course considers the challenges of confessing the Christian faith in religiously pluralistic societies in Asia, Africa and Europe. Equivalency: HC0316 Apostles to Reformers

HC 0305 X1 50HISTORY I-FROM APOSTLES TO REF-ONLIFall Semester 2019-2020

An examination of how Christians have practiced, understood and given public witness to their faith from its beginnings to the Western Reformation (1517). This course pays particular attention to topics formative of Christian identity such as orthodoxy, heresy, Trinity, mission, culture, and politics. This course considers the challenges of confessing the Christian faith in religiously pluralistic societies in Asia, Africa and Europe. Equivalency: HC0316 Apostles to Reformers

View new and notable publications from our faculty.

Faculty Publications