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Dirk G. Lange
Academic Dean
651-641-3468
Guillermo C. Hansen
Asoociate Dean for Graduate Theological Education
651-523-1647

Meet the Faculty

Mark A. Granquist

Mark A. Granquist

Professor of Church History

  • Ph.D. (University of Chicago Divinity School)
  • Cert. Studies (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago)
  • M.Div. (Yale University Divinity School)

Biography

Mark A. Granquist is Professor of the History of Christianity at Luther Seminary, a position he has held since 2007. Prior to this he taught in the Religion Department at St Olaf College, Northfield, Minnesota (1992-2000) and at Gustavus Adolphus College, St Peter, Minnesota (2000-2007).

Granquist has served in parish ministry or Lutheran higher education since his ordination in the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America in 1988. He was pastor of youth and education at Bethel Lutheran Church, Rochester, Minn., 1988-1992, and has served several times as an interim pastor in local congregations.

A 1979 graduate of St Olaf College, Granquist received his M.Div. from Yale University Divinity School in 1984, and his Ph.D. degree from the University of Chicago Divinity School in 1992.

He serves as editor of the Luther Seminary journal “Word & World,” as editor of the “Journal of the Lutheran Historical Conference,” and has been active with the journal “Lutheran Quarterly.”

His publications include “Lutherans in America: A New History” (Fortress, 2014), “Scandinavian Pietists: Spiritual Writings from 19th-century Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland” (Classics of Western Spirituality, 2015), and “The Augustana Story: Shaping Lutheran Identity in North America” (Fortress, 2008). He is one of the editors of the “Dictionary of Luther and the Lutheran Traditions” (Baker Academic, 2017) and the author of many book chapters, articles and essays, especially on the history of Lutherans in North America.

Featured Work

Dictionary of Luther and the Lutheran Traditions

Dictionary of Luther and the Lutheran Traditions

Baker Academic (Sept. 2017)

In the five hundred years since the publication of Martin Luther's Ninety-
Five Theses, a rich set of traditions have grown up around that action and the subsequent events of the Reformation. This up-to-date dictionary by leading theologians and church historians covers Luther's life and thought, key figures of his time, and the various traditions he continues to influence.

Prominent scholars of the history of Lutheran traditions have brought together experts in church history representing a variety of Christian perspectives to offer a major, cutting-edge reference work. Containing nearly six hundred articles, this dictionary provides a comprehensive overview of Luther's life and work and the traditions emanating from the Wittenberg Reformation. It traces the history, theology, and practices of the global Lutheran movement, covering significant figures, events, theological writings and ideas, denominational subgroups, and congregational practices that have constituted the Lutheran tradition from the Reformation to the present day.

Dictionary of Luther and the Lutheran Traditions

Courses

HC 0307 01HISTORY II-FROM REFORMERS TO PRESENSpring Semester 2018-2019

This course is a survey of major events, movements, and figures that have influenced the history of Christianity and its mission since the Reformation to the present. This course inquires into the roots of present day Christianity in the Reformation and Renaissance, Luther and the Lutheran Reformation, various Protestant and Roman Catholic reforming movements, and other efforts for Christian witness in the early modern period through the eras of enlightenment and Evangelical revivals to the present. The course examines how these traditions of reform and renewal continue to shape how Christians today understand their faith. Prerequisite: HC0305 - History I (for MDIV and Academic MA beginning Fall 2017); Pre-requisites not required for Professional MA or Graduate Certificates. Equivalency: SG0301 -Reform and Expansion or HC0330 History of Christianity 1800-present (for returning students who began prior to Fall 2017).

HC 0307 02 50HISTORY II-FROM REFORMERS TO-ONLIN Spring Semester 2018-2019

This course is a survey of major events, movements, and figures that have influenced the history of Christianity and its mission since the Reformation to the present. This course inquires into the roots of present day Christianity in the Reformation and Renaissance, Luther and the Lutheran Reformation, various Protestant and Roman Catholic reforming movements, and other efforts for Christian witness in the early modern period through the eras of enlightenment and Evangelical revivals to the present. The course examines how these traditions of reform and renewal continue to shape how Christians today understand their faith. Prerequisite: HC0305 - History I (for MDIV and Academic MA beginning Fall 2017); Pre-requisites not required for Professional MA or Graduate Certificates. Equivalency: SG0301 -Reform and Expansion or HC0330 History of Christianity 1800-present (for returning students who began prior to Fall 2017).

HC 1327 01 F6HISTORY OF LUTHERANS IN NORTH AMER Spring Semester 2018-2019

A study of Lutherans in North America, focusing the transplantation and development of distinctive Lutheran traditions, and on the interaction of Lutherans with North American religious life. Students will have opportunity for directed research within the subject matter of this course.

HC 1327 50 F6HISTORY OF LUTHERANS IN NORTH AMER Spring Semester 2018-2019

A study of Lutherans in North America, focusing the transplantation and development of distinctive Lutheran traditions, and on the interaction of Lutherans with North American religious life. Students will have opportunity for directed research within the subject matter of this course.

HC 4345 01 S6NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS IN NOR AMERSpring Semester 2018-2019

An examination of traditional alternative religions, such as the Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Christian Science, as well as newer alternative religions like Scientology, New Age, Wicca, and apocalyptic groups (Waco, Jonestown). Views how these religious groups begin and develop over time, and how they form a challenge to mainline American religion.

HC 4345 50 S6NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS IN NOR AMERSpring Semester 2018-2019

An examination of traditional alternative religions, such as the Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Christian Science, as well as newer alternative religions like Scientology, New Age, Wicca, and apocalyptic groups (Waco, Jonestown). Views how these religious groups begin and develop over time, and how they form a challenge to mainline American religion.

HC 6327 01 F6HISTORY OF LUTHERANS IN NORTH AMER Spring Semester 2018-2019

A study of Lutherans in North America, focusing on two features: the transplantation and development of distinctive Lutheran traditions and the interaction of Lutherans with the wider currents of North American religious life. The Lutheran churches also will be examined as a distinctive tradition within a much larger, pluralistic world, but also in many ways, as a reflection of and reaction to their own North American context. Students will have the opportunity for directed research within the subject matter of this course.

HC 6327 50 F6HISTORY OF LUTHERANS IN N AMER-ONLISpring Semester 2018-2019

A study of Lutherans in North America, focusing on two features: the transplantation and development of distinctive Lutheran traditions and the interaction of Lutherans with the wider currents of North American religious life. The Lutheran churches also will be examined as a distinctive tradition within a much larger, pluralistic world, but also in many ways, as a reflection of and reaction to their own North American context. Students will have the opportunity for directed research within the subject matter of this course.

HC 1365 01LUTHER STUDIES January Term 2018-2019

An orientation in the historical methods and sources in Luther scholarship, featuring some biographical work as well as consideration of controversial issues in research. PRE AND POST WORK REQUIRED JT2018 - MUST SIGN UP WITH INSTRUCTOR BY OCTOBER 1, 2018. STUDENTS WILL BE REGISTERED FROM THAT LIST. MEETS WITH HC6365-01.

HC 6365 01LUTHER STUDIES January Term 2018-2019

An orientation in the historical methods and sources in Luther scholarship, featuring some biographical work as well as consideration of controversial issues in research. PRE AND POST WORK REQUIRED. JT2018 - MUST SIGN UP WITH INSTRUCTOR BY OCTOBER 1, 2018. STUDENTS WILL BE REGISTERED FROM THAT LIST. MEETS WITH HC1365-01

HC 0307 01 50HISTORY II-FROM REFORMER TO PRES-ONFall Semester 2018-2019

This course is a survey of major events, movements, and figures that have influenced the history of Christianity and its mission since the Reformation to the present. This course inquires into the roots of present day Christianity in the Reformation and Renaissance, Luther and the Lutheran Reformation, various Protestant and Roman Catholic reforming movements, and other efforts for Christian witness in the early modern period through the eras of enlightenment and Evangelical revivals to the present. The course examines how these traditions of reform and renewal continue to shape how Christians today understand their faith. Prerequisite: HC0305 - History I (for MDIV and Academic MA beginning Fall 2017); Pre-requisites not required for Professional MA or Graduate Certificates. Equivalency: SG0301 -Reform and Expansion or HC0330 History of Christianity 1800-present (for returning students who began prior to Fall 2017).

HC 4397 98 RSGUIDED READING AND RESEARCH Fall Semester 2018-2019

An independent study under close supervision of a professor. Consult faculty within division.

HC 0305 99 RSRS - HISTORY I APOSTLES TO REFORMERSpring Semester 2017-2018

An examination of how Christians have practiced, understood and given public witness to their faith from its beginnings to the Western Reformation (1517). This course pays particular attention to topics formative of Christian identity such as orthodoxy, heresy, Trinity, mission, culture, and politics. This course considers the challenges of confessing the Christian faith in religiously pluralistic societies in Asia, Africa and Europe. Equivalency: HC0316 Apostles to Reformers

HC 0307 01HISTORY II-FROM REFORMERS TO PRESENSpring Semester 2017-2018

This course is a survey of major events, movements, and figures that have influenced the history of Christianity and its mission since the Reformation to the present. This course inquires into the roots of present day Christianity in the Reformation and Renaissance, Luther and the Lutheran Reformation, various Protestant and Roman Catholic reforming movements, and other efforts for Christian witness in the early modern period through the eras of enlightenment and Evangelical revivals to the present. The course examines how these traditions of reform and renewal continue to shape how Christians today understand their faith. Prerequisite: History I (for MDIV and Academic MA); Pre-requisites not required for Professional MA or Graduate Certificates Equivalency: SG0301 -Reform and Expansion

HC 0307 99 RSRS - HISTORY II REFORMERS TO PRESENSpring Semester 2017-2018

This course is a survey of major events, movements, and figures that have influenced the history of Christianity and its mission since the Reformation to the present. This course inquires into the roots of present day Christianity in the Reformation and Renaissance, Luther and the Lutheran Reformation, various Protestant and Roman Catholic reforming movements, and other efforts for Christian witness in the early modern period through the eras of enlightenment and Evangelical revivals to the present. The course examines how these traditions of reform and renewal continue to shape how Christians today understand their faith. Prerequisite: HC0305 - History I (for MDIV and Academic MA beginning Fall 2017); Pre-requisites not required for Professional MA or Graduate Certificates. Equivalency: SG0301 -Reform and Expansion or HC0330 History of Christianity 1800-present (for returning students who began prior to Fall 2017).

HC 6398 99 I SGUIDED READING AND RESEARCH Spring Semester 2017-2018

An independent study for graduate students. Consult faculty within division and Associate Dean - Graduate Theological Education.

HT 0801 02 50LUTHERAN CONFESSIONAL WRITINGS Spring Semester 2017-2018

A study of the confessions of the Lutheran Church as set forth in the Book of Concord. The documents of the reforming movement, viewed in the historical settings, are explicated in the light of their witness to the centrality of the gospel of justification by faith. Consideration is given to the contemporary importance of this witness for the life and mission of the Lutheran Church in a post-secular age. A central question of the course focuses on what it means to confess today in ecumenical engagement, in culturally diverse situations and interfaith contexts, and how that confession is shaped by those contexts.

HC 0307 50HISTORY II-FROM REFORMERS TO PR-ONLFall Semester 2017-2018

This course is a survey of major events, movements, and figures that have influenced the history of Christianity and its mission since the Reformation to the present. This course inquires into the roots of present day Christianity in the Reformation and Renaissance, Luther and the Lutheran Reformation, various Protestant and Roman Catholic reforming movements, and other efforts for Christian witness in the early modern period through the eras of enlightenment and Evangelical revivals to the present. The course examines how these traditions of reform and renewal continue to shape how Christians today understand their faith. Prerequisite: HC0305 - History I (for MDIV and Academic MA beginning Fall 2017); Pre-requisites not required for Professional MA or Graduate Certificates. Equivalency: SG0301 -Reform and Expansion or HC0330 History of Christianity 1800-present (for returning students who began prior to Fall 2017).

HC 1327 01 F6HISTORY OF LUTHERANS IN NORTH AMER Fall Semester 2017-2018

A study of Lutherans in North America, focusing the transplantation and development of distinctive Lutheran traditions, and on the interaction of Lutherans with North American religious life. Students will have opportunity for directed research within the subject matter of this course.

HC 4350 01 S6CHRISTIANITY AND NEW AMER IMMIGRANTFall Semester 2017-2018

New immigrants to North America change the face of American religion. This course examines the religious aspects of recent immigration, including the impact on the immigrant community and on the wider North American religious culture. It will also consider the ways in which mainline American Protestants can assist and cooperate with the newer immigrant communities.